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Seven Most Important Lessons my Heroes Taught Me

Lesson #7: Never give up on your dreams.

 

            Thomas Edison is reported to have said, “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”

            In 1877, the year he invented the phonograph, Edison said, “Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

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Seven Most Important Lessons my Heroes Taught Me

Lesson #6: Education increases the likelihood of freedom, justice, and peace.

 

            Want to really help solve the world’s problems? Teach.

            The more educated we are, the more curious and empowered we become, the more likely we are to want to travel and experience other cultures. The more we travel, the less likely we are to fear people of foreign cultures and countries. Educated people are more likely to embrace and enjoy each other’s differences. Educated people are less fearful of and more optimistic about finding solutions to the world’s problems.

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Seven Most Important Lessons my Heroes Taught Me

Lesson #5: Whatever it is you do, do it the best you can.

 

           It is better to do one thing right than 10 things half-baked. Always give it your best shot, no matter how big or small the task.

 

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Seven Most Important Lessons my Heroes Taught Me

 

Lesson #4: To create social justice, agitate with love.

            People won’t just change their behavior because it makes sense. They usually have to be motivated, excited, inspired, and sometimes even shook up to want to become activists.

 

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Seven Most Important Lessons my Heroes Taught Me

 Lesson #3: Optimism works.

 

            Helen Keller was left blind and deaf by a severe illness when she was nearly two years old. With the help of her teacher and mentor, Anne Sullivan, she used her exceptional mind and strong will to learn how to communicate.

            In 1904, Keller graduated with honors from Radcliffe College. She authored a number of books about her experiences while lecturing and fundraising on behalf of handicapped people. She proved to the world that disability does not mean inability.

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